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Monday, February 8, 2016

Book Review ‘The Way of Men’ by Jack Donovan


Is the author, crazy, extreme or realistic? How important is the traditional male role? Is masculinity critical? Is there a tribal instinct that drives heterosexual men to strive to impress one another rather than women?

Ideals about men and women are changing. An issue we once approached with humor, now, in a society focused on political correctness, the theory takes on new meaning. For better or worse, there is a school of thought that questions the wisdom in the movement towards a softer more emotional male and whether or not it is destructive to men and/or society.

Are we raising wimpy sons? As the mother of three sons, I have a lot of thoughts about the issue, but not many answers.

It warms my heart to see a dad braiding his daughter’s hair. Likewise, I’m touched daily, watching my neighbor as he raises his well-balanced daughter on his own. Of course, most of all, I am proud of my son when he tends to my baby granddaughter’s needs.

Nevertheless, by nature men and women are different, which leaves many to wonder whether we are in the midst of an evolutionary change or do we just have it all wrong?

Jack Donovan believes the traditional male is an integral part of a successful existence, and in his book The Way of Man, he makes an interesting and often strong case for man’s historical role, and the frustrations men endure as they try to conform to an idealistic changing society.

Albeit controversial, it is an interesting and thought-provoking exploration into masculinity and the possibility of an innate tribal nature that might ultimately dictate the journey of our progression and the success of our changing idealism.

Undoubtedly, Jack Donovan approaches the subject with some pretense, but his vast studies in male social anthropology and his clever style of writing, add an entertaining element to the examination.

Although the book is short in length; it is long in impression.

The Way of Men is available in paperback, ebook, and audio at Amazon and other book retailers. 

Review by Sammy Sutton